Hanabi Fireworks Beat Takeshi Kitano Liner Notes

International superstar Takeshi .Kitano combines cool violence and powerful emotions to reinvent the gangster-film genre in his explosive and award-winning thriller, Fireworks.
A hard-boiled ex-cop, haunted by a troubled past and pushed to the edge by the shooting of his partner, confronts his demons in a ruthless quest for justice and redemption.
Hailed by critics around the world as one of the best films of the year, Fireworks combines visual poetry and heart-stopping action, marking Kitano as one of the most accomplished and exciting filmmakers working today.
'ONE OF THE DECADE'S GREAT FILMS!"
-JohnPowers, VOGUE
"BRUTAL!"
-Jane Sumner, THE DALLAS MORNING NEWS
"LIKE A CHARLES BRONSON 'DEATH WISH' MOVIE!"
- Roger Ebert, THE CHICAGO SUN-TIMES
"SCENES OF HARROWING CARNAGE!"
— Glenn Kenny, PREMIERE MAGAZINE
Written and Directed by TAKESHI KITANO Produced by MASAYUKI MORI, YASUSHI TSUGE and TAKIO YOSHIDA
Associate Producers SHIGERU WATANABE, KOUICHI MIYAGAWA and HIDETO OSAWA Cinematography HIDEO YAMAMOTO
Edited by TAKESHI KITANO and YOSHINORI OTA Music JOE HISAISHI Art Director NORIHIRO ISODA
Starring BEAT TAKESHI, KAYOKO KISHIMOTO, REN OSUGI, and SUSUMU TERAJIMA
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N-E-Wl YORKER
VIDEO
MILESTONE film & video
LETTERBOXED WITH ENHANCED SUBTITLES
JAPAN 103 minutes/Color In Japanese with English subtitles
©1997 Office Kitano ©1998 New Yorker Films Artwork
WARNING: This DVD is licensed for private home use, in store rental or library purposes. All other rights -including duplication, broadcast by any means and all forms of public performance - are prohibited.
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0717119666040
WEB LINKS
Please place this disc in the DVD-ROM drive of your computer and follow the steps below to access the attached link
Web Link Instructions: This feature will only work if
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2. Double click on the "fireworks_web" icon. Hnk does not work p]ease check
3. Double click on the "weblink.html" icon. to make sure you are connected
4. Double dick on the web link of your choice, to the internet.
www.newyorkerfilms.com
Also On DVD From NEW YORKER VIDEO
A SUMMER'S DAY m SPECIAL FEATURES
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TIM ROTH'S
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AFTER LIFE
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MON ONCLE D'AMERIQUE
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(Original Japanese Theatrical Poster
FILM TRAILERS
Japanese American
ART GALLERY
A journey through Kitano's FIREWORKS paintings
PROFILES
Takeshi Kitano • Kayoko Kishimoto
Ren Osugi • Susumu Terajima
Tetsu Watanabe
FEATURETTE:
A behind the scenes look at the making o! FIREWORKS
(Approximately 16 minutes)
SCENES
A BROKEN COP
Nishie • Holdup • Fate
'S PAIN
k" (Intervi
(Interview)
PAYBACK
Punks • Revenge • Chopsticks • Carnage "Interest" (Interview)
gic • Fireworks • Vacation • Falling "Love vs. Violence" (Interview)
ON THE PRODUCTION
There w|as a magazine the other day that asked if they could publish parts of my screenplay. I told them I'll have to watch the film and Write it. They thought I was crazy. A film becdmes its own after a while and it goes its own Way, so if you try too hard to stick to the screenplay it becomes very boring. When the actor^ start moving, you have to go with the flow and take the ride.
When wp start shooting, the story is never really complete. What I do is I start playing a survival game with the actors. If an actor is not performing well, I might consider killing off that character, if the actor is very good, I might let him survive until the end.
The wayjl work with set designers is to tell them to p|ut in everything they would normally put into fiat type of setting and then I go in there ancj take out everything I don't want. It takes muph less time than adding things one by one t$ a set. The most fun I've had was when I a^ked the sound man to put in every street soijjnd he could think of into this scene and I just (took out whatever I didn't want, one sound at £ time, until I had the perfect blend of city nois#s. It was much faster than adding one sountl at a time and a lot of fun.
ON DIRECTING:
My biggest insurance as a director is that I am a conpedian. Whether my film bombs or succeed^, I can laugh about it. I sympathize with full-iime filmmakers. People can come up to me and say "Takeshi-san, no one is coming to see your films," and it's easy for me to say "Vou're right. No one is coming." People fifid it funny. But I would think any other filmpnaker would get offended. I can be more adventurous because I have this insurance*. I also try to keep my film career and my television career completely separate. I have my!fees for doing television and a separate contract for doing film. Also, I do not
use money made in television to fund my films even though I make so little as a filmmaker (the budget for FIREWORKS was 2.3 million dollars). I sometimes think about how much money I could make if I were on television all the time I spend making films. But the day people start seeing me as a television star making a movie, it's the death of me as a director. So I refuse to go on television and advertise my films. That would destroy me.
ON HOLLYWOOD
I just want to make sure that I have the final cut. Otherwise I as the director become more like a factory manager who doesn't have any say in what the final product will look like. I am asked a lot whether I would like to make a movie in Hollywood. I'd prefer it if Japanese films could succeed in the global market, but unfortunately America is the only place that is doing that right now. So I think if I want to make a change, I need to infiltrate Hollywood and do it from within. I shouldn't say I don't want to shoot Disney movies. What's good about profit-oriented Hollywood is that once you make it big, you can do as you wish. It doesn't matter whether you go over schedule, over budget…you still get final cut. The power structure is clear in Hollywood. I am preparing myself for it, but I also have the urge to run away from it.
I feel like when anybody calls me an "Asian director" it's loaded with preconceptions. If you are an American director, you are worldwide just the way you are. I would really like to get rid of the typical Asian traits, cultures, aesthetics in our films. I don't mean to put down Kurosawa, but I would rather see contemporary Japanese films succeed over samurai films. I hate seeing people sell a blatantly stereotypical Asian look. I realize that this is what sells right now, but that's what I am trying to get away from.
- TAKESHI KITANO
Design: Merrill Fn<
A New Yorker Films, NYC Graphics: Arnie Sawyer Studios, NYu
»g and Compression: Cine-Magnetics Video 8- Digital Laboratories, Armonk, NY

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